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Budget is Conservative and Builds for Tomorrow

posted Apr 20, 2015, 1:11 PM by vfe_ets_veronica.harris@wyo.gov   [ updated Apr 20, 2015, 1:11 PM ]
3/5/2014

OFFICE OF GOVERNOR MATT MEAD
State Capitol
Cheyenne, WY 82002
Ph. (307) 777-7437

March 5, 2014

******FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE******

Contact:
Renny MacKay
Communications Director
renny.mackay@wyo.gov

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Governor Matt Mead has signed the budget bill for the next two fiscal years. The budget remains essentially flat while investing in Wyoming’s future. The budget provides for savings. It also provides for education, local government, wildlife, new technologies, recruiting and retaining large businesses, health, and safety.

“I commend all members of the Legislature for the long hours they put into reviewing this budget. We remain fiscally conservative, and we share the desire to build on our strengths and position ourselves well for tomorrow,” Governor Mead said. “In particular, I applaud the Legislature for investing in cities, towns and counties, building the unified network – the interstate highway system of this era - and continuing to invest in education from kindergarten to our university and colleges.”

The Governor highlighted other provisions of the budget relating to energy, tourism and agriculture – our top three industries, the waiver program for people with developmental disabilities, and water development.

“We have some innovative ideas in this budget. The unified network is certainly part of that and so is the integrated test center to develop new commercial uses for CO2,” Governor Mead said. “I believe this budget is the right approach for enhancing the quality of life for our citizens, maintaining the industries that are the bedrock of our current success and diversifying the economy.”

Governor Mead did have several line item vetoes. “While I am pleased with the budget, there are some areas where I have, after consultation with legislators, exercised my line item veto. In some instances, this was necessary to correct an unintended consequence or provide necessary flexibility,” Governor Mead wrote to lawmakers.

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